Christopher J. Marier

Headshot Christopher Marier

Christopher J. Marier is Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice in the department of Government and Justice Studies at Appalachian State University. He earned his Ph.D. in Criminology from the University of South Florida. His teaching and research currently focuses primarily on policing, race, and theories of social control. Prior to earning his Ph.D., he worked in law enforcement, including assignments in patrol and school policing. He is a recipient of the University of South Florida Graduate Fellowship Award, the ACJS International Section Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award, and the Appalachian State University Undergraduate Research Council Grant. His research has been published in leading journals, including Justice Quarterly, Criminology and Public Policy, and Homicide Studies.

Blog

The Impact of Suspect Race and Precipitating Incident on Community Members’ Assessments of Deadly Force Reasonableness

The contrast between many community members’ views about the extent to which force used by police is excessive and the criminal justice system’s determination of same suggests a “reasonableness divide.” Using survey data from 3600 nationally representative adults, this study assessed one possible reason for this divide—that community members evaluate the reasonableness of deadly force …

NC Officer Health, Fitness, and Wellness

At the direction of the N.C. Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission and the N.C. Sheriffs’ Education and Training Standards Commission, and in a joint effort with partners at the North Carolina Justice Academy, researchers from Appalachian State University conducted a study aimed at understanding what benefit, if any, there would be to requiring …

Ethnic diversity, Ethnic Polarization, and Incarceration Rates: A Cross-national Study

Recent political rhetoric both in the U.S. and abroad has drawn renewed attention to racial and ethnic conflict, state power, and punishment. The salience of minority group conflict on incarceration is well established in theory and research in the U.S. This study explores whether racial/ethnic composition explains incarceration rates throughout the world, rather than being …